Memorandum On Safety

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NOTE: This document has been revised February 2017

SAFETY HARNESS AND LIFEJACKET
Any crewmember wearing a foul-weather suit while taking part in an offshore race shall also wear a harness and lifejacket when the wind speed is above 25 knots. It is a mandatory requirement for RORC and EAORA races that owners and crew should wear a harness and life jacket as a regular practice and in particular when reefed, at night, in poor visibility or when alone on deck. (See World Sailing Offshore Special Regulations Category 3 with Category 2 liferaft checklist).

MAN OVERBOARD AND SAFETY EQUIPMENT
Regular practice by skippers and crews of man overboard recovery and strict use of safety equipment, jackstays, harnesses and life jackets as conditions indicate is essential for the safety of your boat and life.

MANOEUVRABILITY OF SHIPS
There is now greatly increased commercial traffic in waters around the United Kingdom. Some large single-screw ships cannot manoeuvre easily and skippers are urged to bear this in mind at all times.

LOOKOUT
Particular attention is drawn to the importance of keeping a full and proper lookout, especially when low cut sails are set.

USE OF ENGINE TO PREVENT COLLISION
If a yacht has to take urgent avoiding action to prevent a collision, the engine may be used and the circumstances reported on the Declaration (see EAORA Sailing Instruction Part 1 paragraph 13). Auxiliary engines should be kept in a condition in which they will start readily.

WHITE FLARES
While it is not a mandatory requirement to carry them, White flares may be used at any time to draw attention to the presence of the yacht. Flares carried for this purpose should be kept in readiness for instant use, be clearly marked and separate from red flares. Red flares or orange smoke may be used in man overboard recovery.

LAMPS
High powered lamps are required to be carried on board but caution should be observed in their use especially if aimed at ships' bridges for long periods as this can obscure the pilots' vision.

RADAR REFLECTORS
Care should be taken to display these correctly in a position at least 13ft above the water-line in accordance with World Sailing instruction.

SEARCH AND RESCUE PROCEDURES
Attention is drawn to the "Annual Summary of Admiralty Notices to Mariners" available from Mercantile Marine Offices in the UK and from Admiralty Chart Agents. Also, available from the Hydrographic Office web site http://www.ukho.gov.uk/ProductsandServices/MartimeSafety/Pages/NMPublic.aspx

ADEQUATE CHARTS
Attention is drawn to the importance of adequate charts for likely harbours of refuge (ISAF Special Regulation 4.11).

WATERTIGHT INTEGRITY
Strong well-fitting hatches and lockers which can be, and are kept, clamped shut are fundamental to the watertight integrity and seaworthiness of any vessel (World Sailing Special Regulation 3.08.).

VHF RADIO
Attention is drawn to EAORA Sailing Instructions Part 1 paragraph 15, severe weather reporting. Competitors are reminded of the importance of continually monitoring VHF during severe weather conditions and may consider the fitting of cockpit speakers to make monitoring easier.

FIRST AID
Attention is drawn to the importance of carrying a properly stocked First Aid Kit and to ensure at least one member of your crew has completed current First Aid training. You should also be aware of any special medical problems within your crew and how to deal with them should the need arise.

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